Buddha Aspects, Meditation Deities, Celestial Buddhas

Ratnasambhava | Dhyāni Buddha

Buddha Ratnasambhava (in Tibetan Rinchen Jungne) is one of the principal 5 Dhyani Buddhas in Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Ratnasambhava represents the wisdom of equality and transforms all inner feelings of pride into vision of equality and equanimity. His name “Ratnasambhava” can be translated as “born from the jewel” or "Origin of Jewels."

Akshobhya | Dhyāni Buddha

Akshobhya Buddha ("Immovable One") in Tibetan Buddhism is the embodiment of 'mirror-like knowledge' : knowledge of what is real, and what is illusion, or a mere reflection of actual reality. Akṣobhya has his own Buddha-field in the East, called the Pure Land Abhirati ('The Ultimate Joy'). Buddha Akshobhya mantra is considered an effective remedy for purifying ones negative karma, somewhat similar to Dorje Sempa mantra.

1000 Armed Chenrezig

Thousand-Armed Chenrezig, Avalokiteśvara, is a Saṁbhogakāya Buddha manifestation, a pure, subtle manifestation that is the union of prāṇa and mind and not simply a fantasy form. Chenrezig represents the pure power of Enlightened Energy. Such form inherently exists in the pure nature of mind and can manifest to everyone, because pure Buddha nature is the nature of all sentient beings. Chenrezig’s form body represents complete

Manjushri - the Prince of Wisdom

Mañjuśrī is a Bodhisattva or Buddha-aspect who represents Wisdom. Usually Mañjuśrī is depicted as a young approximately 16 years old Indian prince, because his Wisdom is not just some learned knowledge, but the highest intuitive wisdom. He is sitting on the lotus flower holding aloft a sword in his right hand, symbolising how he is cutting off the darkness of ignorance, duality and limited worldly

Amitayus - Buddha of Limitless Life

Buddha Amitāyus or Buddha of Limitless Life is a Buddha aspect or a deity associated with meditations and mantras for a long life. Amitāyus is in Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna considered another form of Buddha Amitābha, Buddha Amitāyus. The major Mahāyāna sūtras describing Amitāyus are the small and large Sukhāvatī-vyūha where he is teaching beings in the Pure Land of Amitābha, and the Amitāyurdhyāna sūtra.

Amitabha - Buddha of Limitless Light

We have to speak about Buddha Amitābha or Buddha of Limitless Light, when we talk about Buddhist concepts on death. His name means "Limitless Light" - Amita (unmeasured, boundless, infinite) + ābha (splendour, light; colour, appearance, beauty). After a death all Bodhisattvas, Realized ones and Buddhists familiar with the inner light of Buddha consciousness are going to the Pure Land of Buddha Amitābha.

Medicine Buddha Sangye Menla

In the Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna traditions the Medicine Buddha Sangye Menla takes a special place in the hearts of devotees: Medicine Buddha will protect you from 4 types of ailments: disease, harm from spirits, negative karma and obstacles. Specializing in the curing of diseases, both physical and mental – of which confusion is the root cause – the Medicine Buddha is also the Buddha of

Praises to 21 Tara

In Buddhism this principle is represented by the female Buddha Mother Tārā. It is Tārā who reveals herself in different forms and qualities of the enlightened mind, helping us to overcome all fears and difficulties on the way. One of the root texts in the Tibetan Buddhism, practiced in all four traditions is “Praises to the 21 Tārā”. And the 21 forms of Tara are

Tara - Mother of Tibetan Buddhism

Tārā (Sanskrit: तारा, Tārā; Tib. སྒྲོལ་མ, Drolma), the female Buddha, is considered the other most revered Bodhisattva in Tibetan Buddhism, next only to Chenrezig. In Tibetan Buddhism it is believed that Tārā practice was given by Buddha Śākyamuni together with the Vajrayāna teachings about the Nature of the Mind and Buddhist tantra. According to the story Tārā was a young princess living in the past

Probably the best purification practice, according to Tibetan Buddhism, is meditation on Dorje Sempa and repetition of his mantra. This is also the second part of the preliminary practices in all four traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. Dorje Sempa (in Tibetan: Dorje Sempa, Sanskrit: Vajrasattva) or how we often call him in english – Diamond Mind – is considered a Boddhisattva in Mahayana and Vajrayana traditions.

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